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Commit Code

How to Submit Tiki Code Changes

Here are step-by-step instructions on how to submit Tiki code changes under two different situations: when using a hosted server and when using your own PC as a server for development purposes. How to get commit access and Where to commit are recommended reading before starting these instructions.

Although the process is a little different for each situation, the basic idea is the same. First, you check out the developer version you wish to make changes to. Checking out means downloading the entire developer version from the repository (SourceForge.net) to your server using an SVN program. An SVN program is used because it will keep track of the changes you make and allow you to upload only the changed files to the repository. The entire Tiki program is downloaded (not just the files you want to change) so that you can install and test the Tiki version with your changes. After making and testing your changes, you commit them to the repository using the SVN program, which means your changed files are uploaded into the repository, creating a new Tiki development version that includes your changes.

Below, the processes for both situations (hosted server and PC as server) are described.

Prerequisites

In Either Situation

The following are must-haves in order to commit whether you are using a hosted server or your own PC as the server:

  • SourceForge Account: You will need to have an account at SourceForge.net - click here to register for one.

  • Project Administrator Permission: A Tiki Project Administrator will need to grant you permission to write to the code repository by adding your SourceForge username to the Tiki project as developer. Project Administrators are listed at http://sourceforge.net/projects/tikiwiki/develop.

  • Decide Version: There are different developer versions that changes can be made to. Before you begin, decide or get advice on which version you should download and make changes to. See Where to commit for more information. Which version you intend to change affects the path you will need to specify when checking out and downloading those files. The paths for the different versions can be found at SourceForge.net at https://svn.code.sf.net/p/tikiwiki/code/.

With a Hosted Server

The following are must-haves in order to commit on a hosted server in addition to the general prerequisites noted above:

  • SSH/Shell Access: You will need to access your server using shell access. This may be available from your web host (or you may be able to request it). If so, it will show up on the cPanel (if you have one) in the Security section. Otherwise there are free third-party programs that do the same thing (like PuTTy - and here's a list of such programs).
    Close
    noteLinux and Mac
    Linux and Mac machines already include a system utility called Terminal that provides shell access.
  • SVN: Your server will need to have SVN installed. If it's not installed, try typing apt-get install subversion while connected through Shell Access to install it.

With Your PC as Server

In addition to the must-haves noted above for either situation, here are additional must-haves in order to commit when using your PC as a server:

  • Third-Party SVN Program: You will need to install a third-party SVN program. A list of such programs can be found on this Wikipedia page, or see following Recommended Solution section.

  • Third-Party source code editor: You will need to download and install a third-party code editor to make the changes you wish to make. Do not use a plain text editor (like Word). A list of code editors can be found on this Wikipedia page, or see following Recommended Solution section.
    Close
    warningWarning
    It's very important to set your code editor to:
    (1) use Unix-style line breaks (LF) and not Windows style breaks (CF + LF), and
    (2) encode documents with UTF-8 without BOM (the "without BOM" is important).


Of course other software is required to set up your PC as a server in the first place (see Using Your PC as the Server on the next page or read on about a recommended solution for setting up a development environment.

One recommendation on how to set up a development environment on your machine is to use XAMPP to set up your machine as a server, and Aptana Studio for the code editor and SVN program (and more). The good thing about these is that they are multi-platform (LINUX, Mac, Windows) and they are packages that save you from having to install multiple programs (oh yes, and they're open source and free!). See XAMPP-Aptana for some tips on using these programs together.

Using a Hosted Server

Overview of Steps

Here's an overview of the steps for committing using a hosted server:

  • Get onto your server through SSH/Shell Access
  • Run the svn command to download the development version you want to change onto your server
  • Make the code changes you want to make and save them
  • Run the svn command to check your changes
  • Test your the Tiki install that you just changed to see if it functions
  • Run the svn command to commit your changes
  • End the SSH/Shell Access connection

These steps are described in detail below.

Close
noteNote
These instructions assume you are using a standard shell on a Linux machine (i.e., your server is running Linux). If the server is using Windows, please make sure to run something like dos2unix before you commit.

Step 1: Get on Your Server Using SSH/Shell Access

  1. Access the server you want to download to through SSH/Shell Access (through cPanel or third-party software). You will need to enter the following at a minimum:
    1. The server's host name or IP Address
    2. Your username on that server
    3. The related password

    Connect to remote server via SSH
    ssh username@server.com
    enter password

    You can accept message about RSA key fingerprint.

  2. Once on your server, move to the web directory
    Move to the web directory, typically "www"
    cd www


  3. Create an empty directory on your server to download to like you would for a normal install of Tiki
    Create a directory, for example "tiki"
    mkdir tiki


  4. Move to the directory you want to download to. For example, if you want to download to tiki, then type the following and hit enter:
    Move to download directory
    cd tiki

Step 2: Checkout Files via SVN

Type in "svn checkout (path) ." and hit enter to check out a development version. The (path) in the command is the path on SourceForge.net to the version you wish to make changes to.

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tipTip
See Where to commit for guidelines on deciding the appropriate version to commit to.

Below, two alternatives are shown: checking out a branch and checking out the trunk. In both cases, assume we found a bug in the last_mod plugin and therefore want to change the lib/wiki-plugins/wikiplugin_lastmod.php file.

  1. Example: Checking out Branch 12.x (see Get code for available Versions)
    Checking out branch 12.x
    svn checkout https://svn.code.sf.net/p/tikiwiki/code/12.x .


  2. Example: Checking out Trunk
    Checking out trunk
    svn checkout https://svn.code.sf.net/p/tikiwiki/code/trunk .

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warningImportant
In both cases the last space and period at the end is very important - it causes the download to be made to here, in the directory where you are at when the command is made.

After hitting enter, you should see the file names scrolling up the screen as the files are downloaded. At the end, you should see a message telling which revision has been checked out, as in this screenshot:

Layer 1

Step 3: Make Your Changes

You can make changes either using your normal edit interface or through the shell access.

Using Normal Edit Interface

The easiest way to make changes is usually through whatever interface you normally use, for example by going through cPanel > File Manager and opening the file with your server's code editor. After you've made and saved your changes, go to Step 4.

Expand the instructions below if you're making changes through the shell access instead.

Use Shell Access to Make Changes

[+]

Step 4: Check Your Changes

  1. Go back to the SSH/shell access screen and make sure you are in the top level tiki directory, www/tiki in our example

  2. In the SSH/shell access screen type "svn diff" to view your changes:
    Use svn diff to view changes
    svn diff

    All changes you have made to all files will be shown as in the following screenshot:
    Image

    As you can see, only one line was changed here (actually one character, an O was changed to a Z). Since this was the intention, we will move on to test the change.

Step 5: Test Your Tiki Install

  1. If you haven't already, install the developer version you have downloaded and changed by following the normal Installation procedures through an internet browser.
    Close
    noteNote
    If you get a server error, you may need to set the permissions for all of the files you downloaded to 755.

  2. Once installed, test Tiki to ensure that your changes work properly.

Step 6: Commit Your Changes

  1. Type the svn commit command which consists of 3 parts:

    1. The svn command: svn commit -m

    2. A note describing the change: "[FIX] (short description of fix) " for example
      Each description should begin with one of the following tags which identify the type of change
      • [NEW] for additions of new features
      • [ENH] is an enhancement; not really new but makes things work better (e.g. look and feel, performance...)
      • [MOD] is a change in how things work, which may disrupt user habits, for example changing the default value of an option
      • [FIX] for bug fixes of any sort
      • [SEC] for security fix operations (implies [FIX])
      • [DB] for changes in the database
      • [REM] for feature removals
      • [KIL] for removals of unused or obsolete files (has been used in the sense of [REM] prior to Tiki 6)
      • [REF] for refactoring; changes the structure of the code (to make it cleaner or clearer), without changing its actual behaviour.
      • [REL] for the release process

      If there is a wish related to this, add "Ref: http://dev.tiki.org/wish426"

      In case of a "backport," (committing a change already made in trunk to an earlier version), a backport reference should be added in front. For example, "[bp/r28500] [FIX]..." in a commit message to the branch branches/5x, means this fix is a backport of trunk revision 28500 to the next version of Tiki 5x. Depending on the period, backports are subject to an extra level of review so please read Quality Team and Where to commit first or ask on the mailing list or IRC if unsure.
    3. The file path: filepath
      • You can leave the filepath off, in which case all changes shown in svn diff will be committed (even if more than one file has been changed)

    Following our example, this would be:
    Commit command
    svn commit -m "[FIX] Fixed display of time zone, which was showing as %O" lib/wiki-plugins/wikiplugin_lastmod.php

    Here's a screenshot (with a slightly different description):
    Image

  2. When prompted, enter your SourceForge username and password
    Close
    tip.Tip
    You may be prompted for a password based on your server user name instead of your SourceForge user name. Just hit enter to move to a prompt for entering your SourceForge user name.

  3. You will get a message indicating that your commit was successful

Step 7: Disconnect Shell Connection

Shell command
exit


Step 8: Be Proud of Yourself

Tiki is the collective work of hundreds of people. It works because volunteers, like you, take the time to make it better.

Notice of your commit will appear in the Tiki IRC chat channel. Go here to see it in the logs or, better yet, log on to the actual chat channel just before you commit to see the notice pop up live!

See next page for instructions when using your own PC as a development server.
...page... Wiki Pagination has not been enabled on this site.

Using Your PC as the Server

These instructions apply when you will be downloading the development version to your own PC which is set up as a server for purposes of developing. Windows and MAC PCs can also be set up as servers when the necessary server programs (Apache, MySQL, PHP, etc.) are installed either individually or packaged together (see this Wikipedia page for a list of such packages).

Close
noteNote
The examples and screenshots used in this section were created using a Windows PC with XAMPP as the web server package and TortoiseSVN as the SVN software. TortoiseSVN is a shell extension that is integrated into Windows Explorer when installed. It is accessed by right-clicking on folders or files in Windows Explorer.

Another recommendation that works across all platforms is to use XAMPP with Aptana Studio. Please see XAMPP-Aptana for more tips on using these programs together to create your development environment.

Overview of Steps

Here's an overview of the steps for committing when using your PC as aserver:

  • Use a third-party SVN program to check out the development version you want to change onto your PC
  • Use a third-party code editor to make the code changes you want to make and save them
  • Use a third-party SVN program to to check your changes
  • Test your the Tiki install that you just changed to see if it functions
  • Use a third-party SVN program to commit your changes

These steps are described in detail below.

Step 1: Checkout Files Via SVN Program

Checking out means you are downloading the files to your PC under a third-party SVN program that keeps track of all changes that are made.

Below, assume that we found a bug in the last_mod plugin and therefore want to change the lib/wiki-plugins/wikiplugin_lastmod.php file. Assume that we've decided to change Branch 7.x after looking at Where to commit.

  1. Open Windows Explorer and right-click on an empty folder where you would like the development version to be downloaded into and select "SVN Checkout...".
    In this example, the folder is called tikisvn.

  2. In the pop-up, type in the following as the URL of the repository: http://svn.code.sf.net/p/tikiwiki/code/7.x, as shown in this screenshot:
    Image

  3. After clicking OK, the pop-up will show the files being downloaded and will indicate when the download is complete as shown in this screenshot:
    Image

Step 2: Make Your Changes

  1. Make changes to the file you wish to fix using a third party code editor.
    Close
    warningWarning - File settings
    Any files you change should be saved with "LF" as the line break characters (Unix-style), not CR + LF as used in Windows. These characters are usually hidden so use a "show all characters" type option or look in the settings or preferences to make sure the line breaks are Unix-style.

    Also, make sure the settings are set to encode documents with UTF-8 without BOM (the "without BOM" is important).

    In our example, lib/wiki-plugins/wikiplugin_lastmod.php is being changed. After the change is saved, the changed status is indicated by the red color (the green color on the other folders and file icons show that the files were downloaded using the SVN program):
    Image

Step 3: Check Your Changes

  1. In TortoiseSVN, this is done by right clicking the tikisvn folder and selecting "SVN Commit..." from the menu (even though you're not committing yet!). The following pop-up will appear:
    Image

  2. Double click the file name shown in the above pop up to see the following record of changes made:
    Image
  3. Check to see that these are the changes you intended

Step 4: Test Your Wiki Install

  1. If you haven't already, install the developer version you have downloaded and changed by following the normal Installation procedures through an internet browser.

  2. Once installed, test Tiki to ensure that your changes work properly.

Step 5: Commit Your Changes

  1. Type a description of the change you have made in the Commit pop-up that was brought up in the first part of Step 3 above and click OK. (If the pop-up is closed, right-click the tikisvn folder and select "SVN Commit..." from the menu to open it again.)


    The description should begin with one of the following tags which identify the type of change:
    • [NEW] for additions of new features
    • [ENH] is an enhancement; not really new but makes things work better (e.g. look and feel, performance...)
    • [MOD] is a change in how things work, which may disrupt user habits, for example changing the default value of an option
    • [FIX] for bug fixes of any sort
    • [SEC] for security fix operations (implies [FIX])
    • [DB] for changes in the database
    • [REM] for feature removals
    • [KIL] for removals of unused or obsolete files (has been used in the sense of [REM] prior to Tiki 6)
    • [REF] for refactoring; changes the structure of the code (to make it cleaner or clearer), without changing its actual behaviour.
    • [REL] for the release process

    In case of a "backport," (committing a change already made in trunk to an earlier version), a backport reference should be added in front. For example, "[bp/r28500] [FIX]..." in a commit message to the branch branches/5x, means this fix is a backport of trunk revision 28500 to the next version of Tiki 5x. Depending on the period, backports are subject to an extra level of review so please read Quality Team and Where to commit first or ask on the mailing list or IRC if unsure.


    Here's a screenshot showing the description filled in:
    Image


    Close
    commentComment
    Note that the Commit pop-up was brought up by right-clicking on the tikisvn folder and not on the actual file that was changed. There is no need to right-click the files that are actually changed - right-clicking the top level tiki folder will bring up only the files that have been changed for the commit.


  2. Enter your SourceForge username and password when prompted

  3. The SVN program will notify you when the commit is completed and successful

Step 6: Be Proud of Yourself

Tiki is the collective work of hundreds of people. It works because volunteers, like you, take the time to make it better.

Notice of your commit will appear in the Tiki IRC chat channel. Go here to see it in the logs or, better yet, log on to the actual chat channel just before you commit to see the notice pop up live!



alias

Spaces [toggle]

Search Wishes (subject only) [toggle]

Keywords [toggle]

The following is a list of keywords that should serve as hubs for navigation within the Tiki development and should correspond to documentation keywords.

Each feature in Tiki has a wiki page which regroups all the bugs, requests for enhancements, etc. It is somewhat a form of wiki-based project management. You can also express your interest in a feature by adding it to your profile. You can also try out the Dynamic filter.




TogetherButton [toggle]

Documentation: PluginTogether