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Commit Code

Using Your PC as the Server

These instructions apply when you will be downloading the development version to your own PC which is set up as a server for purposes of developing. Windows and MAC PCs can also be set up as servers when the necessary server programs (Apache, MySQL, PHP, etc.) are installed either individually or packaged together (see this Wikipedia page for a list of such packages).

 Note

The examples and screenshots used in this section were created using a Windows PC with XAMPP as the web server package and TortoiseSVN as the SVN software. TortoiseSVN is a shell extension that is integrated into Windows Explorer when installed. It is accessed by right-clicking on folders or files in Windows Explorer.


There are other combinations of software that can be used as well - see Create an IDE for documentation on some configurations.

Overview of Steps

Here's an overview of the steps for committing when using your PC as a server:

  • Use a third-party SVN program to check out the development version you want to change onto your PC
  • Use a third-party code editor to make the code changes you want to make and save them
  • Use a third-party SVN program to check your changes
  • Test your the Tiki install that you just changed to see if it functions
  • Use a third-party SVN program to commit your changes

These steps are described in detail below.

Step 1: Checkout Files Via SVN Program

Checking out means you are downloading the files to your PC under a third-party SVN program that keeps track of all changes that are made.

Below, assume that we found a bug in the last_mod plugin and therefore want to change the lib/wiki-plugins/wikiplugin_lastmod.php file. Assume that we've decided to change Branch 7.x after looking at Where to commit.

  1. Open Windows Explorer and right-click on an empty folder where you would like the development version to be downloaded into and select "SVN Checkout...".
    In this example, the folder is called tikisvn.

  2. In the pop-up, type in the following as the URL of the repository: http://svn.code.sf.net/p/tikiwiki/code/7.x, as shown in this screenshot:


  3. After clicking OK, the pop-up will show the files being downloaded and will indicate when the download is complete as shown in this screenshot:

Step 2: Make Your Changes

  1. Make changes to the file you wish to fix using a third party code editor.

     Warning - File settings

    Any files you change should be saved with "LF" as the line break characters (Unix-style), not CR + LF as used in Windows. These characters are usually hidden so use a "show all characters" type option or look in the settings or preferences to make sure the line breaks are Unix-style.

    Also, make sure the settings are set to encode documents with UTF-8 without BOM (the "without BOM" is important).

    In our example, lib/wiki-plugins/wikiplugin_lastmod.php is being changed. After the change is saved, the changed status is indicated by the red color (the green color on the other folders and file icons show that the files were downloaded using the SVN program):

Step 3: Check Your Changes

  1. In TortoiseSVN, this is done by right clicking the tikisvn folder and selecting "SVN Commit..." from the menu (even though you're not committing yet!). The following pop-up will appear:


  2. Double click the file name shown in the above pop up to see the following record of changes made:
  3. Check to see that these are the changes you intended

Step 4: Test Your Wiki Install

  1. If you haven't already, install the developer version you have downloaded and changed by following the normal Installation procedures through an internet browser.

  2. Once installed, test Tiki to ensure that your changes work properly.

Step 5: Commit Your Changes

  1. Type a description of the change you have made in the Commit pop-up that was brought up in the first part of Step 3 above and click OK. (If the pop-up is closed, right-click the tikisvn folder and select "SVN Commit..." from the menu to open it again.)


    The following tags can be used to distinguish changes:

    In the case of a "backport," (committing a change already made in trunk to an earlier version), a backport reference should be added in front. For example, [bp/r28500] [FIX]... in a commit message to the branch branches/5x, means this fix is a backport of trunk revision 28500 to the next version of Tiki 5x. Depending on the period, backports are subject to an extra level of review so please read Quality Team and Where to commit first or ask on the mailing list or IRC if unsure.


    Here's a screenshot showing the description filled in:



     Comment

    Note that the Commit pop-up was brought up by right-clicking on the tikisvn folder and not on the actual file that was changed. There is no need to right-click the files that are actually changed - right-clicking the top-level tiki folder will bring up only the files that have been changed for the commit.


  2. Enter your SourceForge username and password when prompted

  3. The SVN program will notify you when the commit is completed and successful

Step 6: Be Proud of Yourself

Tiki is the collective work of hundreds of people. It works because of volunteers, like you, take the time to make it better.

Notice of your commit will appear in the Tiki IRC chat channel. Go here to see it in the logs or, better yet, log on to the actual chat channel just before you commit and see the notice pop up live!


alias

Keywords

The following is a list of keywords that should serve as hubs for navigation within the Tiki development and should correspond to documentation keywords.

Each feature in Tiki has a wiki page which regroups all the bugs, requests for enhancements, etc. It is somewhat a form of wiki-based project management. You can also express your interest in a feature by adding it to your profile. You can also try out the Dynamic filter.

Accessibility (WAI & 508)
Accounting
Administration
Ajax
Articles & Submissions
Backlinks
Banner
Batch
BigBlueButton audio/video/chat/screensharing
Blog
Bookmark
Browser Compatibility
Calendar
Category
Chat
Comment
Communication Center
Consistency
Contacts Address book
Contact us
Content template
Contribution
Cookie
Copyright
Credits
Custom Home (and Group Home Page)
Database MySQL - MyISAM
Database MySQL - InnoDB
Date and Time
Debugger Console
Directory (of hyperlinks)
Documentation link from Tiki to doc.tiki.org (Help System)
Docs
DogFood
Draw
Dynamic Content
Preferences
Dynamic Variable
External Authentication
FAQ
Featured links
Feeds (RSS)
File Gallery
Forum
Friendship Network (Community)
Group
Help
History
Hotword
HTML Page
i18n (Multilingual, l10n, Babelfish)
Image Gallery
Import-Export
Install
Integrator
Interoperability
Inter-User Messages
InterTiki
jQuery
Kaltura video management
Karma
Live Support
Logs (system & action)
Lost edit protection
Mail-in
Map
Menu
Meta Tag
Missing features
Visual Mapping
Mobile
Mods
Modules
MultiTiki
MyTiki
Newsletter
Notepad
OS independence (Non-Linux, Windows/IIS, Mac, BSD)
Organic Groups (Self-managed Teams)
Packages
Payment
PDF
Performance Speed / Load / Compression / Cache
Permission
Poll
Profiles
Quiz
Rating
Realname
Report
Revision Approval
Scheduler
Score
Search engine optimization (SEO)
Search
Security
Semantic links
Share
Shopping Cart
Shoutbox
Site Identity
Slideshow
Smarty Template
Social Networking
Spam protection (Anti-bot CATPCHA)
Spellcheck
Spreadsheet
Staging and Approval
Stats
Survey
Syntax Highlighter (Codemirror)
Tablesorter
Tags
Task
Tell a Friend, alert + Social Bookmarking
Terms and Conditions
Theme
TikiTests
Timesheet
Token Access
Toolbar (Quicktags)
Tours
Trackers
TRIM
User Administration
User Files
User Menu
Watch
Webmail and Groupmail
WebServices
Wiki History, page rename, etc
Wiki plugins extends basic syntax
Wiki syntax text area, parser, etc
Wiki structure (book and table of content)
Workspace and perspectives
WYSIWTSN
WYSIWYCA
WYSIWYG
XMLRPC
XMPP




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